HomeBuyer Report sample

Home Buyers Survey

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The content of survey reports will vary considerably due to factors including the age, type, location and condition of the property, and materials used in its construction.

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Download sample HomeBuyer Report HomeBuyer Report sample

Download sample Building Survey Building Survey sample

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 Mortgage Valuation
 Property Valuation
 Homebuyer Report
 Building Survey
 Mortgage
Valuation
Property
Valuation
Homebuyer
Report
Building
Survey
Help you make a reasoned and informed decision
as to whether to proceed, reconsider or renegotiate on the purchase
 TickTickTick
Identify potential problems
such as any repairs or replacements the property needs including We inspect roofs, chimneys and other surfaces on the outside of the building from ground level
  Tick Tick
Can help you negotiate a better property price
Where problems are discovered or a lower valuation is given, buyers are enabled to negotiate a lower buying price
 TickTickTick
Show traffic light ratings
which give you a green/amber/red condition of your property in an easy to understand format
  Tick 
Prepare you
for potential costly repairs after you move in
  TickTick
Completed by a RICS Surveyor
Surveyor Local’s national panel of Surveyors are fully qualified and highly experienced chartered surveyors
TickTickTickTick
Independent valuation
gives you a professional valuation of the property, helping prevent you from paying too much for the property
 TickTick 
Exhaustive report
a more in depth survey on construction, issues and defects
   Tick
Appropriate for all properties
a suitable survey, irrespective of age, construction type, condition and level of modification
   Tick
Highlights urgent issues
Reports on any defects needing urgent attention
  TickTick
On-going maintenance
Professional recommendations on repairs and maintenance
  TickTick
Building reinstatement Costs
Included for insurance purposes
  Tick 
Appropriate for standard property types
Suitable for properties built later than1900 of standard construction (brick and tile)
  Tick 
Appropriate for unusual property types
Suitable for a older, unusual constructed (e.g. thatch roof) or extensively modified properties (e.g. extended) or those in need of modernisation
   Tick
Advice for your Solicitor
Observations that may impact the legal title investigation conducted by your solicitor.
  TickTick
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Home Buyers Survey

Profile photo of Martin Tate

Your questions answered by a RICS Surveyor in your area

Martin Tate

BSc Dipl. HI MRICS, MRPSA

Ask Martin a question askasurveyor@surveyorlocal.co.uk

Updated: 29/11/16

HomeBuyer Report

Should we go for a Full Structural Survey, Building Survey or HomeBuyer Report on a home in UK and which is cheaper?

The Full Structural Survey has been renamed by RICS as a Building Survey, although it is essentially the same level of survey.

If the UK property is an apartment, or is 100 or more years old, or has been substantially modified, or is of non standard construction, RICS advise the cheaper Building Survey.

If you are planning to do any major works on the UK property, you should you go for a Building Survey. The Building Survey is less cheap but it will offer an in-depth analysis of the UK property's condition as well as advice on defects as well as maintenance options .

For more detailed advice get a UK Home Survey Quote via our website or call 0800 038 6667 to speak to our survey team.

What is a home survey, and what will the surveyor actually do?

There are three main types of home buyers survey, the HomeBuyer Report, the Building Survey and the Property Valuation Report. Each of these has a different focus, so buyers should consider which of the three is the right choice for them:

HomeBuyer Report - A general survey of a home, including any visible defects or issues. If the property to be surveyed is of standard construction, and was built after 1900, the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) recommend that the HomeBuyer Report is usually the best choice. The report is delivered in a standardised format for easy reference. The HomeBuyer Report includes a valuation.

Building Survey - A more in-depth survey of a property, including all accessible areas of a home. RICS recommend the building survey for older properties, or those of non-standard construction. Building survey reports are tailored by the individual surveyor, and can address any additional questions or concerns. Note that this home buyers survey does not include a valuation as standard.

Property Valuation Report - The most basic of the three, this report is primarily a valuation, and will not include details of particular defects.

For more detail please see the detailed survey comparison table.

Building Surveys on houses

When buying a derelict Victorian detached property, is it best to order a full structural survey?

The Full Structural Survey has been renamed as a Building Survey. Go for the Building Survey if you are thinking of buying the house outlined. The HomeBuyer Report is appropriate if buying a 60 year old or less UK property of normal construction materials.

There are some restrictions exist with any survey as a qualified RICS surveyor is not in a position to force or open up the structure of the UK house for example, or inspect where doing so could cause damage to the house.

Historical listed building

If the property is a listed building, what additional considerations will the surveyor make?

There are great benefits to owning a listed building or a home protected within a conservation area. The unique character of a property or locale is preserved, and the sense of continuity and history can increase both residents' enjoyment, and property prices.

Unfortunately, these benefits are not without a cost. Grade I and II listed buildings are identified as being of special historical or architectural interest, and worthy of preservation. Although this listing is not intended to 'freeze' the building at a point in time, in practice it does heavily restrict what changes you can make, even with consent. Major alterations, especially external, to a house in a conservation area also require consent from the local authority. Worse, in cases where a previous owner has made changes to a property in a conservation area without consent, the current owner will be liable to pay for remedial work to 'undo' these modifications.

The surveyor will be unable to confirm if previous changes had consent from the council (this should be confirmed by a solicitor during the conveyancing process), but they will be able to investigate the appearance and construction of the property. They can then advise as to whether any recent or 'out of character' changes have been made. Listed buildings must usually be repaired in a 'sympathetic' manner, with appropriate materials and methods, and new owners should not underestimate the additional cost of this.

In general, listed property will be well maintained, which the building survey will confirm, but where a property has deteriorated, a buyer can find themselves saddled with an order requiring them to make necessary repairs. Any repair or upkeep recommendations in a property surveyors report should therefore be carefully considered, and the responsibility of owning a listed building taken seriously.

Sandbags - a common sight on the Oxford flood plain

Will the surveyor be able to tell me if there has been any damage due to flooding and whether it is likely in the future?

Flooding can cause severe damage to both contents and property, and occurs throughout England and Wales. Recent conflict between insurers and the government has caused a great deal of uncertainty for buyers and home owners in areas at a high risk of flooding, regarding whether they will be able to insure against flooding in the future at all.

Unfortunately, distance from water or height above sea-level is no guarantee that a home will be secure, as heavy rain and poor drainage can both also cause extensive flooding.

The Environment Agency maintain a flood warning service, including regularly updated area risk assessments.

As with many aspects of home ownership, prevention is better than a cure when considering flooding. Flood water can enter a property though a number of routes, including air bricks, poorly fitted doors and windows, and seepage through external walls. A property surveyor should be able to assess whether a house is susceptible to flooding via these routes, and can advise on repairs or additional preventative measures.

These can include costly but effective solutions e.g. the use of lime-based plaster on walls and properly constructed drainage, and less expensive options like the installation of air brick covers and door guards.

Profile photo of Martin Tate

Your questions answered by a RICS Surveyor in your area

Martin Tate

BSc Dipl. HI MRICS, MRPSA

Ask Martin a question askasurveyor@surveyorlocal.co.uk

Updated: 29/11/16

HomeBuyer Report

Should we go for a Full Structural Survey, Building Survey or HomeBuyer Report on a home in UK and which is cheaper?

The Full Structural Survey has been renamed by RICS as a Building Survey, although it is essentially the same level of survey.

If the UK property is an apartment, or is 100 or more years old, or has been substantially modified, or is of non standard construction, RICS advise the cheaper Building Survey.

If you are planning to do any major works on the UK property, you should you go for a Building Survey. The Building Survey is less cheap but it will offer an in-depth analysis of the UK property's condition as well as advice on defects as well as maintenance options .

For more detailed advice get a UK Home Survey Quote via our website or call 0800 038 6667 to speak to our survey team.

What is a home survey, and what will the surveyor actually do?

There are three main types of home buyers survey, the HomeBuyer Report, the Building Survey and the Property Valuation Report. Each of these has a different focus, so buyers should consider which of the three is the right choice for them:

HomeBuyer Report - A general survey of a home, including any visible defects or issues. If the property to be surveyed is of standard construction, and was built after 1900, the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) recommend that the HomeBuyer Report is usually the best choice. The report is delivered in a standardised format for easy reference. The HomeBuyer Report includes a valuation.

Building Survey - A more in-depth survey of a property, including all accessible areas of a home. RICS recommend the building survey for older properties, or those of non-standard construction. Building survey reports are tailored by the individual surveyor, and can address any additional questions or concerns. Note that this home buyers survey does not include a valuation as standard.

Property Valuation Report - The most basic of the three, this report is primarily a valuation, and will not include details of particular defects.

For more detail please see the detailed survey comparison table.

Building Surveys on houses

When buying a derelict Victorian detached property, is it best to order a full structural survey?

The Full Structural Survey has been renamed as a Building Survey. Go for the Building Survey if you are thinking of buying the house outlined. The HomeBuyer Report is appropriate if buying a 60 year old or less UK property of normal construction materials.

There are some restrictions exist with any survey as a qualified RICS surveyor is not in a position to force or open up the structure of the UK house for example, or inspect where doing so could cause damage to the house.



Historical listed building

If the property is a listed building, what additional considerations will the surveyor make?

There are great benefits to owning a listed building or a home protected within a conservation area. The unique character of a property or locale is preserved, and the sense of continuity and history can increase both residents' enjoyment, and property prices.

Unfortunately, these benefits are not without a cost. Grade I and II listed buildings are identified as being of special historical or architectural interest, and worthy of preservation. Although this listing is not intended to 'freeze' the building at a point in time, in practice it does heavily restrict what changes you can make, even with consent. Major alterations, especially external, to a house in a conservation area also require consent from the local authority. Worse, in cases where a previous owner has made changes to a property in a conservation area without consent, the current owner will be liable to pay for remedial work to 'undo' these modifications.

The surveyor will be unable to confirm if previous changes had consent from the council (this should be confirmed by a solicitor during the conveyancing process), but they will be able to investigate the appearance and construction of the property. They can then advise as to whether any recent or 'out of character' changes have been made. Listed buildings must usually be repaired in a 'sympathetic' manner, with appropriate materials and methods, and new owners should not underestimate the additional cost of this.

In general, listed property will be well maintained, which the building survey will confirm, but where a property has deteriorated, a buyer can find themselves saddled with an order requiring them to make necessary repairs. Any repair or upkeep recommendations in a property surveyors report should therefore be carefully considered, and the responsibility of owning a listed building taken seriously.

Sandbags - a common sight on the Oxford flood plain

Will the surveyor be able to tell me if there has been any damage due to flooding and whether it is likely in the future?

Flooding can cause severe damage to both contents and property, and occurs throughout England and Wales. Recent conflict between insurers and the government has caused a great deal of uncertainty for buyers and home owners in areas at a high risk of flooding, regarding whether they will be able to insure against flooding in the future at all.

Unfortunately, distance from water or height above sea-level is no guarantee that a home will be secure, as heavy rain and poor drainage can both also cause extensive flooding.

The Environment Agency maintain a flood warning service, including regularly updated area risk assessments.

As with many aspects of home ownership, prevention is better than a cure when considering flooding. Flood water can enter a property though a number of routes, including air bricks, poorly fitted doors and windows, and seepage through external walls. A property surveyor should be able to assess whether a house is susceptible to flooding via these routes, and can advise on repairs or additional preventative measures.

These can include costly but effective solutions e.g. the use of lime-based plaster on walls and properly constructed drainage, and less expensive options like the installation of air brick covers and door guards.

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